Speakers

CITRIS Day 2015 > Speakers

speaker
Governor Gray Davis
37th Governor of California

Joseph "Gray" Davis was overwhelmingly elected the 37th governor of California in 1998, winning 58 percent of the vote. As Governor, he made education a top priority, signing legislation to strengthen California's K-12 system by establishing the Academic Performance Index to increase accountability in schools, and expanding access to higher education with a record number of scholarships and college loans. These reforms improved student achievement scores for six consecutive years. While presiding over California during an unprecedented economic expansion – where the State became the 5th largest global economy, Davis made record investments in infrastructure, created four Centers of Science and Innovation on UC campuses, and expanded state health insurance for an additional one million children. He also was the first Governor in the nation to authorize stem cell research. As Governor he demonstrated bold environmental leadership by signing the first law in the nation to reduce global warming and greenhouse gases. He also created the first Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Registry, and was the first to establish the nation's most ambitious commitment to renewable energy by creating the statewide Renewables Portfolio Standard. Despite a wave of Republican victories across the nation in 2002, Davis was re-elected to a second term. Davis graduated from Stanford University (Cum Laude) and Columbia Law School, and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service during the Vietnam War. He served as lieutenant governor (1995-1998), state controller (1987-95), and state assemblyman (1982-86). Davis is Of Counsel in the Los Angeles office of Loeb & Loeb, LLP where he provides strategic advice to clients on numerous matters. He is also a member of the bi-partisan Think Long Committee, a Senior Fellow at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, Co-Chair of the Southern California Leadership Council, and speaks before a number of civic and government organizations on important issues of the day. Governor Davis was also honored to be the Keynote Speaker at the Columbia Law School Graduation Ceremony in May of 2009.

speaker
Dale Dougherty
Founder and Executive Chairman of Maker Media, Inc.

Dale Dougherty is the founder and Executive Chairman of Maker Media, Inc. which launched Make: magazine in 2005, and Maker Faire, which held its first event in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006. Dale’s vision and mission continue to be the guiding force for the family of brands. “The maker movement is contributing to a thriving market ecosystem, serving the needs of makers as they seek out product support, startup advice, and funding avenues. Make: plays an important role as a collaborator and resource for makers as they transition from hobbyists to professionals.” As Executive Chairman, Dale is involved in editorial and content strategy, and both business and product development. As part of this process, he forges strategic partnerships in support of maker education, and global, cultural, and economic initiatives.Make: began at O’Reilly Media where Dale was a co-founder and the first editor of their computing trade books. When not in the office, Dale can be found making award-winning wines with his family in Sebastopol, CA.

speaker
Stuart Russell
Professor of Computer Science, UC Berkeley

Stuart Russell is a Professor of Computer Science and Smith-Zadeh Professor in Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco. Stuart received his B.A. with first-class honours in physics from Oxford University in 1982 and his Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford in 1986. He then joined the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, where he is Professor (and formerly Chair) of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and holder of the Smith-Zadeh Chair in Engineering. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at UC San Francisco and Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum's Council on AI and Robotics. He is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award, the Mitchell Prize of the American Statistical Association and the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and the ACM Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award. In 1998, he gave the Forsythe Memorial Lectures at Stanford University and from 2012 to 2014 he held the Chaire Blaise Pascal in Paris. He is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has published over 150 papers on a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence including machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, knowledge representation, planning, real-time decision making, multitarget tracking, computer vision, computational physiology, and global seismic monitoring. His books include "The Use of Knowledge in Analogy and Induction", "Do the Right Thing: Studies in Limited Rationality" (with Eric Wefald), and "Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach" (with Peter Norvig).